3 November 2022
But have we ever (been) immersed? Atmospherological cues

Tonino Griffero

21 May 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Difficult Heritage: disputed figures in contemporary memorial museums

Giulia Bertolazzi

21 May 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
“Antimonumenta”: artistic practice in feminist Mexico

Francesca Romana Gregori

9 May 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Death and Virtual Mourning. The “Return of the Dead” in Digital Afterlife

Maria Serafini

7 May 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Vierundzwanzig Beine! Carts, chariots, carriages and other (image-)media in Warburg’s Mnemosyne

Katia Mazzucco

16 April 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Education meets Virtual Reality. Reasoning on learning outcomes, inclusion and didactic scenarios

Ilaria Terrenghi

4 April 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Rape or “rape”? Virtual violence and the somatechnical body

Pietro Conte

26 March 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Chiromorphisms. The technical genesis of modern disability

Alessandro Costella

15 February 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
The Obscene Device. Archaeology of Immersive Pornographies

Roberto Malaspina

1 February 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Techniques of Enchantment. Magic and Contemporary Technology

Sofia Pirandello

25 January 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Alternative Worlds – VR without Headsets

Margherita Fontana

11 January 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
A world of imprints. The epistemology of visual evidence in digital and virtual media-ecologies

Rosa Cinelli

21 December 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
FEMINIST HORROR THEORY – Filmic Forms and Female Identity: Rewriting in the Key of Gender

Rossana Galimi

5 December 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
From Photography to Virtual Reality and back again. A conversation with Francesco Jodice

Francesco Jodice

20 November 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Immersed in science

Ilaria Ampollini

9 November 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
The burning gaze. An aesthetics of shame in the age of the virtual

Federica Cavaletti

2 November 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Forms of the intermediary: spatiality and durations between technology and aesthetics

Neda Zanetti

12 October 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Virtualizing Spaces: Immersive and Emersive Images from Home to City.

Fabrizia Bandi

28 September 2023
2022/23 Practices
108
LabSim: a fully featured laboratory simulator for innovative teaching of analytical chemistry
27 September 2023
2022/23 Multisensoriality
104
Immersive Rhythms, Dismersive Images: On Music Video’s Affective Atmosphere

Tomáš Jirsa

18 May 2023
2022/23 Multisensoriality
104
Spatialization of Sound

Markus Ophälders

research: Seminar

2022/23 Multisensoriality
104

But have we ever (been) immersed? Atmospherological cues

Tonino Griffero

Apparently, a pathic and atmospherologic aesthetics, i.e. based on the idea that the human being is first and foremost, before any reflection and sometimes even any explicit awareness, involved by feelings that are diffused in the surrounding space and sometimes so authoritative that they do not allow any critical reaction, could not but recognise the centrality of the nowadays widespread theme of immersiveness. But the meaning of 'immersion' is widely disputed, as is that of 'atmosphere'. In fact, it is one thing, to give just one emblematic example, to think that atmosphere is only the feeling in action, while one is experiencing it and by which one is deeply involved (which obviously implies immersion), and quite another to admit the possibility that an atmospheric feeling, while presenting itself as a direct affordance to our situated perception, can instead be detected even without implying any personal involvement, thus allowing the percipient an ex-centricity which could also become an effective critical distance. Having assessed some of the different types of atmospheric experience and some of the many paradoxes that invalidate the very notion of 'immersion', we must also ask ourselves whether an 'atmospheric competence', in the case of atmospheres that are actually involving and for which the felt body is a precise sounding board, does not also, if not above all, imply the possibility that an initial immersion is followed by a relatively critical (re)emersion

Biography

Tonino Griffero

Tonino Griffero is Full Professor of Aesthetics (University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Italy)

 

Selected bibliography

Recent books:
Atmosferologia. Estetica degli spazi emozionali, Roma-Bari 2010; 2 ed. Milano 2017; engl. tr. Atmospheres. Aesthetics of Emotional Spaces, London-New York 2014;
Quasi-cose. La realtà dei sentimenti, Milano 2013; engl. tr. Quasi-Things. The Paradigm of Atmospheres, Albany (N.Y.) 2017;
Il pensiero dei sensi. Atmosfere ed estetica patica, Milano 2016; enlarged engl. tr. Places, Affordances, Atmospheres. A Pathic Aesthetics, London-New York 2020;
The Atmospheric “We”. Moods and Collective Feelings, Milan 2021;
with G. Moretti (ed.), Atmosphere/Atmospheres. Testing a new paradigm, Milan 2018;
with G. Francesetti (ed.), Psychopathology and Atmospheres. Neither Inside nor Outside, Newcastle upon Tyne 2019; enlarged it. tr., Psicopatologia e atmosfere. Prima del soggetto e del mondo, Roma 2022;
with M. Tedeschini (ed.), Atmospheres and Aesthetics. A Plural Perspective, Basingstoke 2019.lgrave Macmillan 2019).

research: seminar

But have we ever (been) immersed? Atmospherological cues

Tonino Griffero

Apparently, a pathic and atmospherologic aesthetics, i.e. based on the idea that the human being is first and foremost, before any reflection and sometimes even any explicit awareness, involved by feelings that are diffused in the surrounding space and sometimes so authoritative that they do not allow any critical reaction, could not but recognise the centrality of the nowadays widespread theme of immersiveness. But the meaning of 'immersion' is widely disputed, as is that of 'atmosphere'. In fact, it is one thing, to give just one emblematic example, to think that atmosphere is only the feeling in action, while one is experiencing it and by which one is deeply involved (which obviously implies immersion), and quite another to admit the possibility that an atmospheric feeling, while presenting itself as a direct affordance to our situated perception, can instead be detected even without implying any personal involvement, thus allowing the percipient an ex-centricity which could also become an effective critical distance. Having assessed some of the different types of atmospheric experience and some of the many paradoxes that invalidate the very notion of 'immersion', we must also ask ourselves whether an 'atmospheric competence', in the case of atmospheres that are actually involving and for which the felt body is a precise sounding board, does not also, if not above all, imply the possibility that an initial immersion is followed by a relatively critical (re)emersion

3 November 2022
17:00
18:30

Online

But have we ever (been) immersed? Atmospherological cues
Tonino Griffero
Online
20221103
17:00
18:30