6 June 2019
Gregarious Loneliness. On Virtual Crowds

Martine Beugnet

2 July 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Images from an Exhibition. Inhabiting the world with the stereoscope

Giovanni Fiorentino

12 June 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Faraway, So Close! Bridging distances between Anthropological Philosophy and Media Anthropology

Martino Quadrato

12 June 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
The Automatic Body: a mediarcheological approach

Alice Peli

21 May 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Difficult Heritage: disputed figures in contemporary memorial museums

Giulia Bertolazzi

21 May 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
“Antimonumenta”: artistic practice in feminist Mexico

Francesca Romana Gregori

9 May 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Death and Virtual Mourning. The “Return of the Dead” in Digital Afterlife

Maria Serafini

7 May 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Vierundzwanzig Beine! Carts, chariots, carriages and other (image-)media in Warburg’s Mnemosyne

Katia Mazzucco

16 April 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Education meets Virtual Reality. Reasoning on learning outcomes, inclusion and didactic scenarios

Ilaria Terrenghi

4 April 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Rape or “rape”? Virtual violence and the somatechnical body

Pietro Conte

26 March 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Chiromorphisms. The technical genesis of modern disability

Alessandro Costella

15 February 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
The Obscene Device. Archaeology of Immersive Pornographies

Roberto Malaspina

1 February 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Techniques of Enchantment. Magic and Contemporary Technology

Sofia Pirandello

25 January 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Alternative Worlds – VR without Headsets

Margherita Fontana

11 January 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
A world of imprints. The epistemology of visual evidence in digital and virtual media-ecologies

Rosa Cinelli

21 December 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
FEMINIST HORROR THEORY – Filmic Forms and Female Identity: Rewriting in the Key of Gender

Rossana Galimi

5 December 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
From Photography to Virtual Reality and back again. A conversation with Francesco Jodice

Francesco Jodice

20 November 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Immersed in science

Ilaria Ampollini

9 November 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
The burning gaze. An aesthetics of shame in the age of the virtual

Federica Cavaletti

2 November 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Forms of the intermediary: spatiality and durations between technology and aesthetics

Neda Zanetti

12 October 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Virtualizing Spaces: Immersive and Emersive Images from Home to City.

Fabrizia Bandi

research: Seminar

2018/2019 Avatar
95

Gregarious Loneliness. On Virtual Crowds

Martine Beugnet

In the eyes of the modernist thinkers, film, the emblematic artistic and cultural form of the XXth century, offered itself as the medium of the crowd, experienced by a mass public that could gaze back at its own image. In contrast, VR does not appear to ‘naturally’ foster an experience of being as part of a multitude. Once we start wearing an Oculus we are effectively separated from whoever might be in the room, an erasure of the “audience effect” (Julian Hanich) that might explain why, so far, the crowd plays a relatively limited role in Virtual Reality: we might encounter a few other avatars, lead a small team and fight hordes of enemies, or hide in a crowd, but we rarely belong to a crowd. Yet as a frame-free visual environment, that relies less on watching than on experiencing, might VR not be construed as the perfect medium for the practice not merely of watching, but of being in a crowd? Concepts of milieu (Simondon), and becoming (Gilles Deleuze), as well as Judith Butler’s re-reading of Hanna Arendt might help us assessing whether or not, the crowd, as a changeable phenomenon, signals one of the limits of what avatars may stand for.

research: seminar

Gregarious Loneliness. On Virtual Crowds

Martine Beugnet

In the eyes of the modernist thinkers, film, the emblematic artistic and cultural form of the XXth century, offered itself as the medium of the crowd, experienced by a mass public that could gaze back at its own image. In contrast, VR does not appear to ‘naturally’ foster an experience of being as part of a multitude. Once we start wearing an Oculus we are effectively separated from whoever might be in the room, an erasure of the “audience effect” (Julian Hanich) that might explain why, so far, the crowd plays a relatively limited role in Virtual Reality: we might encounter a few other avatars, lead a small team and fight hordes of enemies, or hide in a crowd, but we rarely belong to a crowd. Yet as a frame-free visual environment, that relies less on watching than on experiencing, might VR not be construed as the perfect medium for the practice not merely of watching, but of being in a crowd? Concepts of milieu (Simondon), and becoming (Gilles Deleuze), as well as Judith Butler’s re-reading of Hanna Arendt might help us assessing whether or not, the crowd, as a changeable phenomenon, signals one of the limits of what avatars may stand for.

6 June 2019
17:30
19:30

Sala seminari

Dipartimento di Filosofia "Piero Martinetti"

Via Festa del Perdono 7, Milano

Gregarious Loneliness. On Virtual Crowds
Martine Beugnet
Sala seminari
Dipartimento di Filosofia "Piero Martinetti"
Via Festa del Perdono 7, Milano
20190606
17:30
19:30