21 May 2024
“Antimonumenta”: artistic practice in feminist Mexico

Francesca Romana Gregori

12 June 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Faraway, So Close! Bridging distances between Anthropological Philosophy and Media Anthropology

Martino Quadrato

21 May 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Difficult Heritage: disputed figures in contemporary memorial museums

Giulia Bertolazzi

9 May 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Death and Virtual Mourning. The “Return of the Dead” in Digital Afterlife

Maria Serafini

7 May 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Vierundzwanzig Beine! Carts, chariots, carriages and other (image-)media in Warburg’s Mnemosyne

Katia Mazzucco

16 April 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Education meets Virtual Reality. Reasoning on learning outcomes, inclusion and didactic scenarios

Ilaria Terrenghi

4 April 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Rape or “rape”? Virtual violence and the somatechnical body

Pietro Conte

26 March 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Chiromorphisms. The technical genesis of modern disability

Alessandro Costella

15 February 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
The Obscene Device. Archaeology of Immersive Pornographies

Roberto Malaspina

1 February 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Techniques of Enchantment. Magic and Contemporary Technology

Sofia Pirandello

25 January 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Alternative Worlds – VR without Headsets

Margherita Fontana

11 January 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
A world of imprints. The epistemology of visual evidence in digital and virtual media-ecologies

Rosa Cinelli

21 December 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
FEMINIST HORROR THEORY – Filmic Forms and Female Identity: Rewriting in the Key of Gender

Rossana Galimi

5 December 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
From Photography to Virtual Reality and back again. A conversation with Francesco Jodice

Francesco Jodice

20 November 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Immersed in science

Ilaria Ampollini

9 November 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
The burning gaze. An aesthetics of shame in the age of the virtual

Federica Cavaletti

2 November 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Forms of the intermediary: spatiality and durations between technology and aesthetics

Neda Zanetti

12 October 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Virtualizing Spaces: Immersive and Emersive Images from Home to City.

Fabrizia Bandi

28 September 2023
2022/23 Practices
108
LabSim: a fully featured laboratory simulator for innovative teaching of analytical chemistry
27 September 2023
2022/23 Multisensoriality
104
Immersive Rhythms, Dismersive Images: On Music Video’s Affective Atmosphere

Tomáš Jirsa

18 May 2023
2022/23 Multisensoriality
104
Spatialization of Sound

Markus Ophälders

research: Seminar

2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111

“Antimonumenta”: artistic practice in feminist Mexico

Francesca Romana Gregori
Glorieta de las mujeres que luchan (Paseo de la Reforma)

The artistic practice of Antimonuments consists of installing monumental sculptures in the public space, in order to protest against the government's failure to recognize human rights violations in the country. My research aims to fill the gap in the studies on this practice as a protest against gender-based violence, through the repressive response of the federal and local governments. Previous studies have analyzed countermonuments in postwar contexts while feminist antimonuments, especially Mexican antimonuments, have not yet been investigated by the academic community, aside from some recent contributions.
My research aims to fill this gap by investigating the practice in its threefold nature, namely as a commemoration of the lives of the victims, as a political demonstration and as works of public art.
Furthermore I intend to analyze antimonuments as political media of artivism, examining the historical context of the Mexican Federation and the socio-political structure of the various feminist groups involved, contextualizing these cases within the framework of the fight against gender violence and through a decolonization approach. My research aims to criticize the government's failings in properly commemorating the victims of gender-based violence in Mexico, within the perspective of symbolic restitution. In this sense, the value of antimonuments as difficult heritage according to the Faro Convention (2005) will be investigated, in light of the identifying value that such antimonuments represent for indigenous women in Mexico.

Biography

Francesca Romana Gregorio

Francesca Romana Gregori graduated with a MA in Art History at the University of Padua in 2022. She subsequently enrolled in the Post-Graduate School in Artistic and Historical Heritage at the University of Padua and obtained a 2nd level professional Master in Humanities at the Galilean School of Higher Education following a five years Honors college programme.

Her main research focus lies at the intersection between gender studies, memory studies and contemporary art. She has been investigating antimonuments in Mexico as a medium of demonstration within a feminist framework since 2021, following two research stays in France and the United States. She is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Visual Culture and Media Theory at the University of Milan within the ILF national doctoral programme.

research: seminar

“Antimonumenta”: artistic practice in feminist Mexico

Francesca Romana Gregori
Glorieta de las mujeres que luchan (Paseo de la Reforma)

The artistic practice of Antimonuments consists of installing monumental sculptures in the public space, in order to protest against the government's failure to recognize human rights violations in the country. My research aims to fill the gap in the studies on this practice as a protest against gender-based violence, through the repressive response of the federal and local governments. Previous studies have analyzed countermonuments in postwar contexts while feminist antimonuments, especially Mexican antimonuments, have not yet been investigated by the academic community, aside from some recent contributions.
My research aims to fill this gap by investigating the practice in its threefold nature, namely as a commemoration of the lives of the victims, as a political demonstration and as works of public art.
Furthermore I intend to analyze antimonuments as political media of artivism, examining the historical context of the Mexican Federation and the socio-political structure of the various feminist groups involved, contextualizing these cases within the framework of the fight against gender violence and through a decolonization approach. My research aims to criticize the government's failings in properly commemorating the victims of gender-based violence in Mexico, within the perspective of symbolic restitution. In this sense, the value of antimonuments as difficult heritage according to the Faro Convention (2005) will be investigated, in light of the identifying value that such antimonuments represent for indigenous women in Mexico.

21 May 2024
17:00
19:00

Sala Martinetti

Università degli Studi di Milano

Via Festa del Perdono, 7

“Antimonumenta”: artistic practice in feminist Mexico
Francesca Romana Gregori
Sala Martinetti
Università degli Studi di Milano
Via Festa del Perdono, 7
20240521
17:00
19:00