28 April 2023
The Genealogy of Images. From Focillon and Warburg to Computer Vision and Contemporary Semiotics

Maria Giulia Dondero

15 February 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
The Obscene Device. Archaeology of Immersive Pornographies

Roberto Malaspina

1 February 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Techniques of Enchantment. Magic and Contemporary Technology

Sofia Pirandello

25 January 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Alternative Worlds – VR without Headsets

Margherita Fontana

11 January 2024
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
A world of imprints. The epistemology of visual evidence in digital and virtual media-ecologies

Rosa Cinelli

21 December 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
FEMINIST HORROR THEORY – Filmic Forms and Female Identity: Rewriting in the Key of Gender

Rossana Galimi

5 December 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
From Photography to Virtual Reality and back again. A conversation with Francesco Jodice

Francesco Jodice

20 November 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Immersed in science

Ilaria Ampollini

9 November 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
The burning gaze. An aesthetics of shame in the age of the virtual

Federica Cavaletti

2 November 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Forms of the intermediary: spatiality and durations between technology and aesthetics

Neda Zanetti

12 October 2023
2023/24 /ɪˈməːʃən/
111
Virtualizing Spaces: Immersive and Emersive Images from Home to City.

Fabrizia Bandi

28 September 2023
2022/23 Practices
108
LabSim: a fully featured laboratory simulator for innovative teaching of analytical chemistry
27 September 2023
2022/23 Multisensoriality
104
Immersive Rhythms, Dismersive Images: On Music Video’s Affective Atmosphere

Tomáš Jirsa

18 May 2023
2022/23 Multisensoriality
104
Spatialization of Sound

Markus Ophälders

16 May 2023
2022/23 Multisensoriality
104
Resonance, dissonance, and things that get under one’s skin

Susanna Paasonen

27 April 2023
2022/23 Multisensoriality
104
Between Picture Theory and World View: a Wölfflinian Approach

Michael Jenewein in conversation with Lambert Wiesing and Thomas Zingelmann

19 April 2023
2022/23 Multisensoriality
104
Style and World View: Wölfflin, Schwitters, Beuys.

Lambert Wiesing

3 March 2023
2022/23 Multisensoriality
104
Who is here when I am here?

Michel Reilhac

17 February 2023
2022/23 Practices
108
Another Reality

Immersive Solutions from Training to Business.

16 February 2023
2022/23 Multisensoriality
104
About presence: perception, technologies, immersive environments.

Enrico Pitozzi

3 February 2023
2022/23 Practices
108
Mixed reality for doctors. The ARTICOR software for cardiovascular interventions

research: Seminar

2022/23 Multisensoriality
104

The Genealogy of Images. From Focillon and Warburg to Computer Vision and Contemporary Semiotics

Maria Giulia Dondero

In this talk I will focus on my current research project (“Towards a Genealogy of Visual Forms: Semiotic and Computer-Assisted Approaches to Large Image Collections”, F.R.S.-FNRS, 2022-2025) on the relation between contemporary approaches in Image Processing and the genealogy of visual forms in art history as conceived of by Aby Warburg (Atlas Mnemosyne, 2012 [1924-1929]) and by Henri Focillon (The Life of Forms in Art, 1992 [1934]).

Firstly, I will briefly recall three ongoing research projects, specifically the Media Visualization project of the Cultural Analytics Lab led by Lev Manovich on visual similarities, the Replica project launched by B. Seguin at the EPFL’s Digital Humanities Lab in Switzerland on migration of motifs, and a recent project held by Leonard Impett on the modelization of gestures in paintings. I’ll try to explain why these projects are unsatisfactory with respect to my project of tracing an innovative genealogy of visual forms. Secondly, I will evaluate how the future of the digital analysis of images may benefit from the ideas underlying the ambitious projects of Warburg and Focillon and from the visual semiotics developed by the structuralist and post-structuralist French School.

Thirdly, I will present my conception of forms and forces in images, with the objective of making continuous bodily gestures analyzable in large collections of paintings and photographs. These propositions are based on a method of image segmentation that finds its roots not only in the French School of Semiotics, especially in the tensive semiotics developed by Jacques Fontanille and Claude Zilberberg (Fontanille and Zilberberg 1998), but also in the philosopher Gilles Deleuze’s work on pictorial diagrams (Deleuze 2003), and in the mathematician René Thom’s idea of conflicting forces in painting (Thom 1983). The theoretical basis of this approach is the structuralism and post-structuralism developed in France since the 1960’s and which investigates how meaning is generated by differences and, most recently, by graduated modulations (see “tensive” semiotics, a development of structuralism in the 90’s and 2000’s.)

research: seminar

The Genealogy of Images. From Focillon and Warburg to Computer Vision and Contemporary Semiotics

Maria Giulia Dondero

In this talk I will focus on my current research project (“Towards a Genealogy of Visual Forms: Semiotic and Computer-Assisted Approaches to Large Image Collections”, F.R.S.-FNRS, 2022-2025) on the relation between contemporary approaches in Image Processing and the genealogy of visual forms in art history as conceived of by Aby Warburg (Atlas Mnemosyne, 2012 [1924-1929]) and by Henri Focillon (The Life of Forms in Art, 1992 [1934]).

Firstly, I will briefly recall three ongoing research projects, specifically the Media Visualization project of the Cultural Analytics Lab led by Lev Manovich on visual similarities, the Replica project launched by B. Seguin at the EPFL’s Digital Humanities Lab in Switzerland on migration of motifs, and a recent project held by Leonard Impett on the modelization of gestures in paintings. I’ll try to explain why these projects are unsatisfactory with respect to my project of tracing an innovative genealogy of visual forms. Secondly, I will evaluate how the future of the digital analysis of images may benefit from the ideas underlying the ambitious projects of Warburg and Focillon and from the visual semiotics developed by the structuralist and post-structuralist French School.

Thirdly, I will present my conception of forms and forces in images, with the objective of making continuous bodily gestures analyzable in large collections of paintings and photographs. These propositions are based on a method of image segmentation that finds its roots not only in the French School of Semiotics, especially in the tensive semiotics developed by Jacques Fontanille and Claude Zilberberg (Fontanille and Zilberberg 1998), but also in the philosopher Gilles Deleuze’s work on pictorial diagrams (Deleuze 2003), and in the mathematician René Thom’s idea of conflicting forces in painting (Thom 1983). The theoretical basis of this approach is the structuralism and post-structuralism developed in France since the 1960’s and which investigates how meaning is generated by differences and, most recently, by graduated modulations (see “tensive” semiotics, a development of structuralism in the 90’s and 2000’s.)

28 April 2023
16:30
18:30

Aula 435

Via Festa del Perdono, Milano

The Genealogy of Images. From Focillon and Warburg to Computer Vision and Contemporary Semiotics
Maria Giulia Dondero
Aula 435
Via Festa del Perdono, Milano
20230428
16:30
18:30